Configuring Hardware Monitoring

Hardware Sentry monitors the hardware of almost any server and external storage device available in datacenters. This section explains how to configure the monitoring of local and remote hosts.

Configuring Hosts Monitoring

To configure a local or one or several remote hosts, you need to complete the following steps:

Step 1 - Identify the host(s) to add to the monitoring environment

Step 2 - Select the protocol to use to connect to the host

Step 3 - Specify the connector to use

Step 4 - Configure the collection protocol settings

Step 5 - Apply the connection settings to the host

Additional settings are also available to help you fine-tune your hosts monitoring. You can for example disable the host monitoring if you only need to monitor remote systems, such as blade chassis. Examples of monitoring configuration are available are provided in the Hosts Monitoring Examples section.

Step 1 - Identifying the Host to Monitor

A. Localhost Monitoring

No specific configuration is generally required as Hardware Sentry automatically detects the components of the server it is running on along with the PATROL Agent. However, if the localhost has been removed from the monitoring environment, you need to add it manually:

To add the localhost to the monitoring environment

  1. Right-click the Hardware Sentry icon and select KM Commands > Add a System….
  2. Enter the Internal ID, typically localhost.
  3. (Optional) Enter the FQDN to associate the system to another device in TrueSight. The FQDN uniquely distinguishes a device from any other system and ensures that a device monitored via their management cards or through controllers, for example, is properly identified.
  4. Click Next.

B. Remote System or External Device Monitoring

Remote monitoring allows you to monitor multiple hosts from a single Agent. This feature will prove to be useful if you lack resources or time to deploy a PATROL Agent and Hardware Sentry on several systems.

Hardware Sentry offers the possibility to add remote hosts to your monitoring environment individually or in a batch when the hosts share the same configuration settings (OS, protocol, credentials, etc.). When creating a group of hosts you are proposed to define the group name (Internal ID) as well as the set of hosts included into a group being created. The name (Internal ID) makes it easier for you to identify the hosts that are part of a group in the PATROL console.

Additionally, you can associate your system to Fully Qualified Domain Names (FQDNs) of specific devices in TrueSight when you define the connection settings of your host(s). The FQDN designates the specific location of a device within the Domain Name System (DNS) hierarchy; it communicates the host’s position relative to the root of the DNS namespace. An FQDN enables each connected device to be uniquely identified and located within the monitored environment and therefore ensures that a device is properly identified.

Remote monitoring is required if you need to:

Adding a remote host or an external device to your monitored environment consists in identifying the host(s)/device(s) you wish to monitor and configure the connection settings according to the protocol you need to use. This section provides step-by-step instructions for adding a single host/device or for adding multiple hosts/devices at a time, that will be easily identified as part of a group in the PATROL console.

To add remote host(s) to the monitoring environment

  1. Right-click the Hardware Sentry icon and select KM Commands > Add a System…

    Single host

    Adding a Single Remote Host — System Identification

    • Internal ID: Enter the name of the system or device you wish to monitor
    • Hostname(s) or IP address(es): Enter the Hostname or IP address of the system or device you wish to monitor. Leave this field blank if you have specified the hostname in the Internal ID field.
    • From the drop-down list, select the System or Device type.
    • (Optional) Enter the FQDN to associate the system to another device in TrueSight. The FQDN uniquely distinguishes a device from any other system and ensures that a device monitored via their management cards or through controllers, for example, is properly identified.

    Multiple hosts

    Adding Multiple Remote Hosts — System Identification

    • Internal ID: Enter an ID that will be used as a group name for hosts that share the same configuration information (OS, protocol, credentials, etc.).
    • Hostname(s) or IP address(es): Enter the Hostnames or IP addresses of the hosts you wish to monitor. A group can contain multiple hostnames/IP addresses that must be separated by commas. Alternatively, you can use an external file that contains the list of hosts you want to monitor. The file must be installed on the server hosting the PATROL Agent and its path must be entered in the Hostname(s) or IP address(es) field, prefixed by @ (example: @C:\myHostFileList.txt) and the file must follow this format:
      <hostname/IP>;<FQDN>
      <hostname/IP 2>;<FQDN 2>
      
    • From the drop-down list, select the System or Device type.

    • (Optional) Enter the list of FQDN to associate the system to a device in TrueSight. If a file containing a list of hosts is used, leave this field empty. The FQDN uniquely distinguishes a device from any other system and ensures that a device monitored via their management cards or through controllers, for example, is properly identified.

    The number of FQDNs must match the number of hostnames/IP addresses.

    Hardware Sentry will create as many hosts instances (instances of the MS_HW_MAIN application class) as hostnames/IP addresses. The display of the monitored hosts in the PATROL console can be customized with the Hosts Attachments KM Command.

  2. Click Next to continue.

Step 2 - Selecting the Connection Protocol

To select the connection protocols

  1. Select the protocol(s) to use to establish a connection with the host(s): Selecting the Connection Protocol

    The protocols available for monitoring hosts are:

  2. Click Next.

Step 3 - Specifying the Connectors to Use

By default, Hardware Sentry automatically detects the connectors that are best suited to monitor the system hardware. You can however decide to manually choose the connectors to be used. For an exhaustive list of available connectors, refer to the Hardware Connector Library documentation.

Defining Connectors Selections Mode

To specify the connectors to use

  1. Select one of the following option:
    • (Default and Recommended) Automatic: automatically detect the relevant connectors: In this mode, Hardware Sentry will run tests at each discovery and select the connectors that best match the managed system. You will however be able to exclude connectors from the detection process (see step 5).
    • Manual: specify the connectors to use: In this mode, you will have to manually select the connectors Hardware Sentry should use to monitor the system hardware. Hardware Sentry then runs a full discovery to detect all devices and sensors. If you use this option, pay close attention to the PATROL System Output Window for error messages. A poor selection of connectors may lead the KM to remove all devices and sensors from the Console and may prevent Hardware Sentry from properly monitoring the system’s hardware. For an exhaustive list of available connectors, refer to the Hardware Connector Library documentation.
  2. Click Next.

Step 4 - Configuring Connection Protocol Settings

Configure the protocol(s) you wish to use to communicate with the hardware instrumentation layer of the host(s) (the list of protocols may vary according to the selected device type):

A. HTTP Connection

Hardware Sentry can leverage the HTTP protocol to communicate directly with the CIM server running on the host and collect information.

To configure an HTTP connection:

  1. Configure the HTTP connection settings:

    • the protocol you wish to use: HTTP or HTTPS. By default Hardware Sentry proposes to use HTTPS.
    • the port number to be used. By default, Hardware Sentry proposes to use port 443.
    • the HTTP credentials or leave blank to use the default PATROL account credentials.

    Providing HTTP Credentials

  2. Click Next.

B. OS Commands Settings (localhost)

By default, Hardware Sentry uses the PATROL Agent default account (patrol) to execute commands against the localhost to collect hardware information. If a different user account has been configured, the alternate account must be provided through the Command Execution Credentials dialog box.

To configure an OS Commands connection:

  1. Specify the alternate user account to be used:

    Editing the Localhost Settings — Command Execution Credentials

  2. Enter the credentials of the alternate user account that will be used to execute external commands. Leave blank to use the default PATROL account credentials.

  3. Click Next.

C. SNMP Connection

Hardware Sentry can leverage the SNMP protocol to collect hardware information about the host. In that case, an SNMP agent must be installed on the monitored host and the SNMP connection configured through the SNMP Connection Settings wizard. The information required by Hardware Sentry will vary according to the version used:

SNMP Version | Description | Information Required –|—|– SNMP v1|Supports 32-bit counters.| Community and Port Number (Default: 161). Timeout is set through the PATROL Agent Configuration variable /snmp/default_timeout. SNMP v2c|Supports both 32 and 64-bit counters.| Community, Port Number, and Timeout (Default: 120 seconds). SNMP v3|Encryption and authentication added to the 64-bit counters.| Authentication information (username, protocol, and password), Encryption information (privacy protocol and password), Context name, Port Number, and Timeout (Default: 120 seconds).

To configure an SNMP connection:

  1. Select the SNMP version to be used and click Next.

    Selecting SNMP Version

  2. If you have previously selected SNMP version 1, indicate:

    • the Community to be used. Leave blank if you want Hardware Sentry to automatically detect the SNMP community.
    • the Port number (default: 161).

    Configuring SNMP v1 Connection Settings

  3. If you have previously selected SNMP version 2c, indicate:

    • the Community to be used. Leave blank if you want Hardware Sentry to automatically detect the SNMP community.
    • the Port number (default: 161).
    • the number of seconds Hardware Sentry will wait for an SNMP response (Default timeout: 120 seconds). This timeout covers all the sub-queries that compose the ‘parent’ query.

    Configuring SNMP v2c Connection Settings

  4. If you have previously selected SNMP version 3, indicate:

    • The Username to be used to perform the SNMP query.
    • The Authentication protocol to be used to authenticate the SNMP v3 messages. Possible values are: None, MD5, SHA.
    • The Authentication password to be used to authenticate the SNMP v3 messages.
    • The Privacy protocol to be used to authenticate SNMP v3 messages. Possible values are: None, AES, DES.
    • The Privacy password associated with the privacy protocol.
    • The Context name accessible to the SNMP entity.
    • The Port number (default: 161).
    • The number of seconds Hardware Sentry will wait for an SNMP response (Default timeout: 120 seconds). This timeout covers all the sub-queries that compose the ‘parent’ query.

    Configuring SNMP v3 Connection Settings

  5. Click Next.

D. Configuring an SSH Connection (remote)

Hardware Sentry can leverage the SSH protocol to communicate directly with the remote host and collect information.

To configure an SSH connection:

  1. Provide the SSH connection credentials:

    • SSH, enter the credentials required to connect to the remote host through the SSH protocol.
    • SSH with authentication key (optional), you will be prompted for specific credentials, that is a Username, an OpenSSh Private Key File and a Passphrase (if required).

    Providing SSH Connection Credentials

    (Linux/UNIX) If the PATROL Agent default account does not have sufficient privileges to execute commands and cannot be granted super-user rights, use the “sudo” utility to authorize users to execute specific commands as another user account (typically root). To configure Hardware Sentry to use “sudo”:

    • Identify the commands run by Hardware Sentry that require advanced privileges.
    • Make sure the sudo utility is installed on the system and the /etc/sudoers file is configured to allow the PATROL Agent to execute the commands as root.
    • Configure “sudo” to allow the PATROL Agent default account to execute the needed commands as root (modify the /etc/sudoers file). Configuring “sudo” requires root privileges.
    • Check that the PATROL Agent default account is properly authorized to execute the needed commands through the “sudo” utility.
    • Click the Sudo Options button:

    Connection Credentials and Connectors on Local Host — Sudo Options

    • Select the commands Hardware Sentry should execute using the “sudo” utility.
    • Enter the command line or leave the field blank to use the default /usr/local/bin/sudo path.
    • Click Accept.

    For more information about Sudo, please refer to Using ‘sudo’ in Hardware Sentry KM.

  2. Click Next.

E. WMI Connection

Hardware Sentry can leverage the WMI protocol to communicate directly with a SMI-S Provider/storage system and collect information.

To configure a WMI connection:

  1. Provide the WMI Credentials or leave blank to use the default PATROL account credentials.

    Providing WMI Credentials

  2. Click Next.

F. WBEM Connection

Hardware Sentry can leverage the WBEM protocol to communicate directly with an SMI-S Provider/storage system and collect information.

To configure a WBEM connection:

  1. Configure the WBEM Credentials:

    • Enter the port number to be used. By default port 5989 is used for encrypted connections and 5988 for non-encrypted connections.
    • Check the Encrypt data for encryption, if needed.
    • Enter WBEM credentials or leave blank to use the default PATROL account credentials.

    Providing WBEM Credentials

  2. Click Advanced Options to access specific settings related to the WBEM connection:

    • Enter the IP address/Hostname of the Multi-Tier Authentication Server (This option is mostly used for VMware servers).
    • Enter the WBEM Namespace or leave blank to let the KM automatically detect the proper name (recommended). If the WBEM credentials are not provided, Hardware Sentry will authenticate using the credentials provided in the previous panel (WBEM Credentials). This therefore disables multi-Tier authentication.

    Providing WBEM Credentials (Advanced Options)

  3. Click Accept to validate your changes.

  4. Click Next.

G. IPMI-over-LAN Connection (remote)

IPMI-Over-LAN is the out-of-band interface used by Hardware Sentry to bypass the usual hardware agents and communicate directly with the motherboard’s BMC chip.

To configure an IPMI-over-LAN connection:

  1. Enter the credentials to connect to the IPMI chip out-of-band (IPMI-over-LAN).

    Providing IPMI-over-LAN Credentials

  2. Click Next.

H. Cisco UCS Connection (remote)

Hardware Sentry can leverage the Cisco UCS API to communicate directly with the Cisco UCS (Unified Computing System) Manager running on the remote host and collect information.

To configure a Cisco UCS connection:

  1. Provide the following information:

    • Encrypt data: Select this option to encrypt the communication between the KM and Cisco UCS Manager using SSL (HTTPS)
    • Username: credentials valid on the specified Cisco UCS Manager
    • Password: password associated to the specified username

    Configuring Cisco UCS API Protocol Settings

  2. Click Next.

Step 5 - Adding Host(s) to the Monitoring Environment

The last step of the configuration of the host monitoring consists in adding the configured host(s) to your monitoring environment.

Configuring the Localhost Settings — Apply Settings

To add configured host(s) to the monitoring environement

  1. (Optional) If you have previously chosen the Automatic connector selection mode, you can click Exclude Connectors to select the connectors to be excluded from the detection process. Click Accept to save your selection.

    Configuring the Localhost Settings — Exclude Connectors

  2. Click Finish to apply the new settings.

Additional Settings

Editing Host(s) Settings

The Edit Settings KM command allows you to modify the connection settings for the localhost or any remote host/device whether it is monitored individually or as part of a group.

To edit host settings

  1. Right-click a host icon > KM Commands > Edit Settings.

    Single Host Monitoring

    Editing Single Host Settings

    Multiple Hosts Monitoring

    Editing Multiple Remote Hosts Settings — System or Device Identification

    Tip: Accessing the remote system’s icon > KM Commands > Edit Settings KM command from any host that is part of a group automatically opens the group configuration settings window.

    Note: The Internal ID cannot be modified.

  2. Modify the necessary information following the different steps of the wizard as described in the Configuring the Host Monitoring (i.e., system or device type, connector selection mode, list of selected connectors, connection credentials, etc.).

    Warning: If you change the monitoring settings for hosts that are part of a group, make sure that these settings apply to all the hosts in the group. Once saved, the new configuration will automatically be applied to all the hosts in the group.

  3. (Optional) If you have previously chosen the “Automatic” connector selection mode, click Exclude Connectors to select the connectors to be excluded from the detection process and click Accept.

    Connection Credentials and Connectors on Remote Host — Exclude Connectors

  4. Click Finish to apply the new settings to the selected host or to all the hosts in a group.

Attaching Hosts

The way hosts are displayed in your monitoring environment can be customized to help you organize your monitoring environment and facilitate the identification of your monitored systems.

To customize the hosts display

  1. Right-click the Hardware Sentry icon > KM Commands > Settings and select the Hosts Attachment….

    Hosts Attachment Settings

  2. Configure the following properties:

    Property Description Default
    Place hosts under the Hardware Sentry KM icon To display all hosts or groups of hosts directly under the Hardware Sentry icon. If unselected, hosts or groups of hosts will automatically be displayed under the PATROL Agent. Selected
    If Hosts are placed directly under the PATROL Agent, prefix hosts label with To add a string that will prefix all hosts name in the PATROL console. Leave blank to display the hosts or groups of hosts with their respective names. Hardware on
    Gather hosts belonging to a group under a container To group the hosts in a container. Selected

Hosts Monitoring Examples

Remote monitoring is required if you need to:

Monitoring a Blade Chassis

Blade servers are small-factor servers that share the same enclosure which provides the powering and cooling for all the blade servers inside the chassis. Most popular blade systems are:

  • Dell Modular Chassis
  • Hitachi BladeSymphony
  • HP BladeSystem
  • IBM BladeCenter
  • Fujitsu-Siemens Blade BX

All these blade chassis are fully supported by Hardware Sentry.

Each blade server can be considered as a true physical server for which every hardware components need to be monitored. A PATROL Agent and Hardware Sentry must be installed on each blade server to monitor the various parts of the blade: processors, memory modules, internal temperature, internal disks, etc.

Additionally, it is important to monitor the different components of the shared enclosure: power supplies and fans notably. Blade enclosures are generally equipped with a management card (the name can vary depending on the manufacturer: management module for the IBM BladeCenter, management blade for the Fujitsu-Siemens Blade BX, iLO or On-board Administrator for the HP BladeSystem, DRAC-MC for the Dell Modular Chassis).

You can also configure Hardware Sentry to connect to the management interface of the enclosure and monitor its hardware parts:

  1. Add a remote host to specify the name and IP address of the management interface.
  2. Specify that the element is a “Blade Chassis or Out-of-band Management Card”.
  3. Choose the appropriate connector corresponding to the type of the chassis or let the KM automatically detect it, and then provide the wizard with the credentials to connect to the management interface (SNMP community or username and password if it is an SSH-based interface). For an exhaustive list of available connectors, refer to the Hardware Connector Library documentation.

In the PATROL Console, you obtain two separate Hardware icons:

  • <blade chassis name>, representing the hardware components of the shared enclosure
  • localhost, representing the hardware components of the server (blade) the KM is running on

    Monitoring a Blade Chassis — Discovered Components

Under the shared chassis, an icon is also created for each blade server in the enclosure with an overall status for the blade (when available).

No additional license capacity is required to monitor the shared blade enclosure in addition to the blade servers present in the main chassis.

Monitoring VMware Servers

Virtualization helps IT administrators reduce capital expenses through server consolidation and optimize operating expenses through automation. Because a virtualized environment faces more risks than a physical one, IT administrators must consider monitoring their virtual machines. They should always keep in mind that when an issue occurs on the physical host, it impacts all the virtual machines running on the server.

As a PATROL Agent cannot be installed on the VMware ESXi Host, the monitoring needs to be done remotely, from a PATROL Agent running on another server, physical or virtual. It is recommended that the PATROL Agent and Hardware Sentry run on a separate physical system (or on a virtual machine on a separate physical system) to ensure continuous monitoring even in case of hardware failures.

Hardware Sentry needs to be manually configured to connect to the VMware ESXi Host to discover what the physical system is made of and collect the status of all components.

For more information about the installation procedure, please refer to the KB article Monitoring VMware ESX/ESXi.

To monitor VMware servers

  1. Right click the local host’s Hardware icon > KM Commands > Add a System…
  2. Identify the system or device you want to monitor remotely and click Next.

    Monitoring VMware Servers — System Identification

    • System or Device name: Enter the name of the system or device you wish to monitor
    • IP address or fully qualified name: Leave this field blank if you specify the host name above
    • System or Device type: Select Management Card/Chip, Blade Chassis, ESXi
  3. Click Next.

  4. Select the WBEM protocol and click Next.
  5. Provide the WBEM credentials.

    Monitoring VMware Servers — WBEM credentials

  6. If you need to use Multi-tier authentication, click on the Advanced Options button:

    Monitoring Another System Remotely — WBEM Credentials — Advanced Options

    • Enter the IP address/Host-name of the Multi-tier Authentication Server.
    • Enter the WBEM namespace or leave the field empty to let the KM automatically detect the proper name (recommended).
    • Click Accept to validate your changes.
  7. Click Next. A new icon is then created in the PATROL Console

    Monitoring VMware Servers — Discovered Components

Monitoring a Server through its Out-of-Band Management Card

For most servers, Hardware Sentry relies on an instrumentation layer running on the operating system itself (an SNMP agent, a WBEM provider, or some system commands). However, for some types of servers (mostly UNIX systems), the information available in-band is not sufficient and does not provide any data regarding environment sensors, power supplies, etc. For these systems, Hardware Sentry offers the ability to get additional information about the server through its out-of-band management card (if any).

By default, Hardware Sentry monitors the hardware components in-band only. To make Hardware Sentry connect to the out-of-band management card and retrieve the additional information available:

  1. Add a remote host.
  2. Enter the name of the out-of-band management card and its IP address.
  3. Select Management Card/Chip, Blade Chassis, ESXi as the system type.
  4. Choose the appropriate connector corresponding to the management card in the system and then enter the credentials to connect to it. For an exhaustive list of available connectors, refer to the Hardware Connector Library documentation.

In the PATROL Console, an additional icon is created:

  • localhost, corresponding to the monitoring done in-band
  • <management card name>, corresponding to the monitoring done out-of-band through the management card.

Monitoring a Server Out-of-Band — Discovered Components

No additional license capacity is required when monitoring a system from both in-band and out-of-band.

Monitoring a SAN Switch

As the importance of the external storage grows with the implementation of blade servers and virtualization, monitoring the center piece of the SAN, i.e. the fiber switch, is more critical than ever. Hardware Sentry is able to monitor SAN switches from Cisco, Brocade and McData: their internal hardware components, fiber ports, temperature, power supplies, fans, as well as the traffic on each port. This greatly helps SAN administrators understand the performance issues in the environment: which servers are very demanding, which array is under pressure, backups impact, etc.

For an exhaustive list of available connectors and detailed information about the supported switches, refer to the Hardware Connector Library documentation.

As a PATROL Agent cannot be installed on a SAN switch:

  1. Install the KM and the PATROL Agent on a regular system.
  2. Configure Hardware Sentry to connect to the SAN switch and monitor it:
    • Add a remote host to specify the name and IP address of the SAN switch.
    • Select the appropriate connector or let the KM detect it automatically (Fiber Alliance SNMP Agent, for Brocade and McData switches; Cisco MDS9000 Series, for Cisco switches). For an exhaustive list of available connectors, refer to the Hardware Connector Library documentation.

A <switch name> icon is created representing all of the monitored components of the switch:

Monitoring a SAN Switch — Discovered Components

Additionally, SAN administrators can use the Ethernet/Fiber Port Traffic Report tool in Hardware Sentry to visualize the amount of data that are processed by each port of the switch on an hourly or daily basis.

Monitoring an External Disk Array

To consolidate the monitoring and reporting of a variety of disk arrays from different vendor, Hardware Sentry supports a wide range of manufacturers: IBM DS, HP EVA, EMC, etc. By relying on their SMI-S standard instrumentation, or on their specific administration tools otherwise, Hardware Sentry monitors the health of the various internal components: the disks, the different levels of allocated volumes, the fiber ports, the environment and the controllers.

Depending on the disk array and the way it is instrumented, the configuration of Hardware Sentry may vary.

  • First case: The disk array is SMI-S compliant itself, i.e. it can be interrogated directly by using the SMI-S protocol (WBEM-based), like the EMC Symmetrix disk arrays. Add a remote host to specify the name and IP address of the disk array. Select the appropriate connector or let Hardware Sentry detect it automatically, and then enter the credentials to connect to the disk array. For an exhaustive list of available connectors, refer to the Hardware Connector Library documentation.

  • Second case: The disk array requires the installation of a management software tool on a separate server or workstation, like the EMC CLARiiON systems. The disk array management tool acts as a “proxy” with the disk array itself. You need to install the PATROL Agent and Hardware Sentry on the server or workstation where the disk array management tool is running. By default, Hardware Sentry will monitor the hardware components of the server or workstation it is running on. Add a remote host to make Hardware Sentry also monitor the disk array through the management “proxy”. Enter the System or Device name and specify “localhost” as the IP address. This will make Hardware Sentry send its SMI-S/WBEM queries to the local management software tool.

  • Third case: IBM DS3000 and IBM DS4000 disk arrays require the installation of the SMCli tool on a server or workstation. You need to install the PATROL Agent and Hardware Sentry on the server or workstation where SMCli has been installed. Add a remote host to make Hardware Sentry use the SMCli tool to connect to the IBM disk array. Enter the name of the disk array and its IP address (note that you do not specify “localhost” as in the previous case, SMICli is not a “proxy” interface). Select the appropriate connector or let Hardware Sentry detect it automatically, and then enter the credentials to connect to the disk array. For an exhaustive list of available connectors, refer to the Hardware Connector Library documentation.

  • Fourth case: NetApp Filers are monitored remotely through their native SNMP Agent. Add a remote host to make Hardware Sentry monitor the internal hardware components of the NetApp filer: enter the name and IP address of the disk array, select the appropriate connector or let Hardware Sentry detect it automatically, and then enter the SNMP community string (For an exhaustive list of available connectors, refer to the Hardware Connector Library documentation). Filers have a much broader feature set than pure disk arrays. Sentry Software provides an additional KM that focuses on the performance and statistics metrics of the filer itself (filesystems, backups, I/O, etc.): NetApp Filers KM for PATROL.

Monitoring a Tape Library

As backups are often centralized on tape libraries, it is important to ensure that these devices are available to backup software products. Hardware Sentry is able to monitor the health of the various internal components of a tape library, including the tape drives and the media changers. Please note that Hardware Sentry does not monitor the backup software products in charge of copying the data to the tapes. It will not report whether a backup operation could not complete or when a backup set is not up to date.

Most tape libraries are instrumented through SNMP. While bearing different vendor names, most tape libraries are OEM’d from StorageTek or Quantum/ADIC. To monitor tape libraries:

  1. Add a remote host to make Hardware Sentry monitor a tape library.
  2. Specify the name of the library and its IP address.
  3. Select the appropriate connector (most probably, simply corresponding to the real manufacturer of the library: IBM, Quantum/ADIC or StorageTek). For an exhaustive list of available connectors, refer to the Hardware Connector Library documentation.
  4. Enter the SNMP community.
Keywords:
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